Today’s speech from ECB President Christine Lagarde was monumental

Lagarde ballerina meme ECB 2

Perhaps unwittingly, ECB President Christine Lagarde today may have introduced a new era in the global economy.

“It looks increasingly unlikely that the disinflationary dynamics of the past decade will return,” she said.

With that, she signaled a gradual rise in interest rates, without setting an upper limit.

Market participants have been arguing over the cause of the latest swoon in risk appetite; pointing to Fed tightening, short-term inflation or global growth worries.

But what if we’re in the process of pricing in persistently high structural inflation? Lagarde pointed to a re-orinentation of global supply chains and the energy transition as long-lasting sources of higher prices. I’d add in demographics and broad under-investment in commodity production.

Ahead of today’s pivotal (in the short-term) US CPI report, it’s worth pondering what a world of stubborn + 3% inflation looks like. We’ve all gotten drunk on cheap money for a decade and sticky inflation

Inflation

Inflation is defined as a quantitative measure of the rate in which the average price level of goods and services in an economy or country increases over a period of time. It is the rise in the general level of prices where a given currency effectively buys less than it did in prior periods. Inflation stems from the overall creation of money. This money is measured by the level of the total money supply of a specific currency, for example the US dollar, which is constantly increasing. However, an increase in the money supply does not necessarily mean that there is inflation. What leads to inflation is a faster increase in the money supply in relation to the wealth produced (measured with GDP). As such, this generates pressure of demand on a supply that does not increase at the same rate. The consumer price index then increases, generating inflation.How Does Inflation Affect Forex? The level of inflation has a direct impact on the exchange rate between two currencies on several levels.This includes purchasing power parity, which attempts to compare different purchasing powers of each country according to the general price level. In doing so, this makes it possible to determine the country with the most expensive cost of living. The currency with the higher inflation rate consequently loses value and depreciates, while the currency with the lower inflation rate appreciates on the forex market. also impacted. Inflation rates that are too high push interest rates up, which has the effect of depreciating the currency on foreign exchange. Conversely, inflation that is too low (or deflation) pushes interest rates down, which has the effect of appreciating the currency on the forex market.

Inflation is defined as a quantitative measure of the rate in which the average price level of goods and services in an economy or country increases over a period of time. It is the rise in the general level of prices where a given currency effectively buys less than it did in prior periods. Inflation stems from the overall creation of money. This money is measured by the level of the total money supply of a specific currency, for example the US dollar, which is constantly increasing. However, an increase in the money supply does not necessarily mean that there is inflation. What leads to inflation is a faster increase in the money supply in relation to the wealth produced (measured with GDP). As such, this generates pressure of demand on a supply that does not increase at the same rate. The consumer price index then increases, generating inflation.How Does Inflation Affect Forex? The level of inflation has a direct impact on the exchange rate between two currencies on several levels.This includes purchasing power parity, which attempts to compare different purchasing powers of each country according to the general price level. In doing so, this makes it possible to determine the country with the most expensive cost of living. The currency with the higher inflation rate consequently loses value and depreciates, while the currency with the lower inflation rate appreciates on the forex market. also impacted. Inflation rates that are too high push interest rates up, which has the effect of depreciating the currency on foreign exchange. Conversely, inflation that is too low (or deflation) pushes interest rates down, which has the effect of appreciating the currency on the forex market.
Read this Term
would be a monumental hangover.

I’ll be writing about this theme extensively in the week ahead. Read her full speech here.

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