Single traffic camera system in London rakes in £ 15.2million in three years

Single set of traffic cameras in London rakes in £ 15.2m in three years: New data reveals the most lucrative traffic traps in the capital that have raised local authorities £ 57m since 2019

  • Bank Junction includes Bank of England, Royal Exchange and Mansion House
  • It has been restricted to buses and cyclists only from 7am to 7pm since 2017
  • Other councils have also raised millions from cameras at restricted junctions

A single set of traffic cameras in the City of London has raked in an astonishing £ 15.2million worth of penalty charges over three years, new research reveals.

Bank Junction, bordered by the Bank of England, the Royal Exchange and Mansion House, has been restricted to buses and cyclists only from 7am to 7pm since 2017 – with £ 130 fines for wrongdoers, reduced to £ 65 if paid within 14 days.

But thousands of motorists have not cottoned on, with an eye-watering £ 3.2million haul in 2021 equating to 40 per cent of such fines levied in the Square Mile, Freedom of Information requests by Bloomberg revealed.

Although takings collapsed by almost half from 2019 – when it raised £ 6.16m, followed by £ 5.78m in 2020 – it is still one of the most lucrative traffic spots in the capital.

This bar chart shows the amount in pounds raised by traffic cameras at Bank Junction in the City of London, which has been restricted to buses and bikes only since 2017

This bar chart shows the amount in pounds raised by traffic cameras at Bank Junction in the City of London, which has been restricted to buses and bikes only since 2017

Outside the City, the most lucrative junction in 2021 was Browning Road North in Newham, which pulled in £ 2.43m;  followed by Pritchard's Road in Hackney - £ 1.39m;  and Culmington Road in Ealing - £ 960,000

Outside the City, the most lucrative junction in 2021 was Browning Road North in Newham, which pulled in £ 2.43m; followed by Pritchard’s Road in Hackney – £ 1.39m; and Culmington Road in Ealing – £ 960,000

Bank Junction was once heavily used by motorists but now has signs warning drivers to use alternative routes – although many of those who have been fined complain the warnings are still not obvious enough.

FOI date showed other major crossroads in London that restrict some types of vehicles have also become major sources of revenue for local authorities with those in Newham, Hackney, Enfield and Lambeth raising a total of £ 57million.

Newham alone raised more than £ 33m in 2020 and 2021 after introducing a swathe of restrictions.

Outside the City, the most lucrative junction in 2021 was Browning Road North in Newham, which pulled in £ 2.43m; followed by Pritchard’s Road in Hackney – £ 1.39m; Culmington Road in Ealing – £ 960,000 and Meadway N14, Enfield – £ 820,000.

Local authorities argue restrictions cut pollution, and help fund essential services, including road maintenance.

A spokesman for the City of London corporation said any surplus raised by fines was ‘ringfenced by law to highways and transport-related activities such as resurfacing’.

Bank Junction is covered by a number of traffic cameras (the apparent locations of which are indicated by red circles)

Bank Junction is covered by a number of traffic cameras (the apparent locations of which are indicated by red circles)

Signs approaching the junction warn that it is for buses and cyclists only from 7am to 7pm - although many of those who have been fined complain they are not obvious enough

Signs approaching the junction warn that it is for buses and cyclists only from 7am to 7pm – although many of those who have been fined complain they are not obvious enough

The junction is bordered by the Bank of England, the Royal Exchange and Mansion House

The junction is bordered by the Bank of England, the Royal Exchange and Mansion House

Traffic cameras at London junctions appear to be – for drivers at least – frustratingly effective, the same cannot be said for the Britain network of speed cameras – half of which appear not to work.

Some 523 out of 1,092 permanent speed cameras in 26 police force areas are broken – with none working in North Yorkshire, Durham and Northamptonshire, a BBC Panorama probe found earlier this year.

Wiltshire also has no fixed or mobile cameras but uses handheld devices, according to the data from a FOI request.

The AA said there was a ‘postcode lottery’ for whether drivers will be caught amid fears that the situation was affecting safety by increasing motorists’ complacency.

Some areas started decommissioning speed cameras ten years ago to save operating costs when they became too expensive to replace after funding changed.

How London authorities raise millions from traffic cameras at junctions

Council area

Newham

Hackney

Enfield

Lambeth

Ealing

Sutton

Waltham Forest

Having

Tower Hamlets

Westminster

2021

£ 11,766,300

£ 8,790,430

£ 7,578,460

£ 7,368,336

£ 6,387,279

£ 648,440

£ 126.0630

£ 673,212

£ 314,590

£ 462,150

2020

£ 11,264,370

£ 4,860,705

£ 3,438,014

£ 961.046

£ 721.012

£ 1,114,480

£ 789,257

£ 534.016

£ 326,690

£ 142,545

2019

£ 255,970

£ 1,157,401

£ 0

£ 390

£ 473,939

£ 987,870

£ 746.016

£ 836,846

£ 353,780

£ 397,410

Source: FOI data

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