Olympian Frazer Clarke on an incredible first year in pro boxing

It’s been a knockout year for the boxer (Picture: Getty Images)

The Tokyo Olympic bronze medalist makes his fourth professional appearance against Kamil Sokolowski on Saturday following three wins, all by knockout, in his first year as a professional after a successful career as an amateur with Great Britain.

With the grandeur of Manchester’s vast AO Arena looming, how does Frazer cope with the pressure of a big fight, and, after such a monumental year, what will Clarke choose to do next?

The Olympian reveals all about his incredible year below.

Four outings, four wins. How would you view your first year in the pro ranks if you beat the very experienced Kamil Sokolowski at the AO Arena in Manchester this weekend?

I’d take that – the plan was five fights but that hasn’t happened because of the injury. Sokolowski is the bogeyman for newcomers to the division. People love to see KOs and that’s what I can hopefully provide again after three in three. I’ve had a few setbacks and the injury I had was testing but I’m ready to rock and roll.

Frazer hopes the crowd will see another knockout performance this Saturday (Picture: Lawrence Lustig/Boxxer)

You made the decision to leave the Great Britain Olympic set-up after ten years. How hard was the transition?

I was institutionalized in that environment and being on your own suddenly and doing things for yourself after all that time is difficult. But being in Loughborough has been a massive help. I’m still getting used to it.

But the good thing about me and my relationship with Rob McCracken is he is not just an inspiration to me and a man I look up to, he is also available on the end of the phone to me.

Frazer admits that it was stressful to leave the Team GB set-up (Picture: Julian Finney/Getty Images)

Was it hard to leave and what was it like choosing a promoter, manager and broadcaster to go with?

Stressful! All I had ever known was Sheffield and the GB team. Some people would say I waited too long. In my younger days, though, I wouldn’t have been professional enough to make the change.

You can’t lie to yourself and think you’re a pro when you’re not living the life. I had everything with the GB team but then you have to look after yourself and that’s not easy.

The boxer spoke about the pressures of the game (Picture: Lawrence Lustig/Boxxer)

What was your reaction when Conor Benn failed a drugs test and his mega-fight with Chris Eubank Jr was called off this month?

It’s not great, it’s not ideal. The reality is boxers find themselves under pressure. A positive test is a positive test but I don’t know too much about Conor’s situation. I’d like to believe people are clean. It’s an awful situation and I don’t dislike him.

He has the pressure, the name, all the eyes on him. Eddie has been building Conor up as if he is the next coming of God. He (Benn) hasn’t even been in boxing that long.

Frazer is working with a new promoter and manager, but he has kept his success as a constant (Picture: Alex Livesey/Getty Images)

Are you excited by the prospect of the Tyson Fury v Derek Chisora ​​trilogy fight next month, eight years after their second clash?

Not really. I understand it from Derek’s point of view – you’d be rubbing your hands together at the chance to fight Tyson now. But I’d have preferred that chance to go to a younger fighter coming through.

Remaining tickets for Saturday’s event are available via the Boxxer website.

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