Klopp closing in on predictable leader for forcing most Premier League sackings ever

Jurgen Klopp is behind only one man when it comes to forcing the most Premier League managerial sackings. Losing to Southampton does not tend to bode well.

With David Moyes apparently one defeat to Everton away from being shown the West Ham doorhaving been sacked after a Goodison Park defeat before, it got us thinking: which managers and clubs have claimed the most coaching scalps in Premier League history?

The following is a rundown of managers who were in charge of the last opponent a coach faced before losing their job. On the rare occasion a manager was sacked after winning (think Daniel Farke at Norwich in 2021/22), that instance is not included; we only want so damaging results that the manager in question had to go soon after. And firings during the season only, please.

Klopp is not the grim reaper of the top flight just yet. And please, never let Liverpool appoint the current leader…

Managers who induced sackings

1 – 52 different managers
From Ron Atkinson, who induced the first managerial sacking in Premier League history when Chelsea axed Ian Porterfield after a 1-0 defeat at Aston Villa in February 1993, to Marco Silva, who forced Villa’s hand When Fulham beat Steven Gerrard’s side 3-0 in October 2022, 52 different coaches have come to be the last straw for a Premier League manager.

2 – Phil Brown
(Luiz Felipe Scolari at Chelsea and Gary Megson at Bolton)

Alan Curbishley
(Chris Hutchings at Bradford and Peter Taylor at Leicester)

Eddie Howe
(Steve McClaren at Newcastle and Ralph Hasenhuttl at Southampton)

Paul Jewell
(Egil Olsen at Wimbledon and Iain Dowie at Charlton)

Paul Lambert
(Les Reed at Southampton and Brian McDermott at Reading)

Steve McClaren
(Walter Smith at Everton and Terry Venables at Leeds)

David Moyes
(Nigel Pearson at Watford and Bruno Lage at Wolves)

Brendan Rodgers
(Rene Meulensteen at Fulham and Manuel Pellegrini at West Ham)

3 – Steve Bruce
(Paul Ince at Blackburn, Paul Lambert at Aston Villa and Javi Gracia at Watford)

Ralph Hasenhuttl
(Claudio Ranieri at Fulham, Quique Sanchez Flores at Watford and Dean Smith at Aston Villa)

Roy Hodgson
(Mick McCarthy at Wolves, Andre Villas-Boas at Chelsea and Claude Puel at Leicester)

Stuart Pearce
(Graeme Souness at Newcastle, Mick McCarthy at Sunderland and Chris Coleman at Fulham)

Tony Pulis
(Paul Hart at Portsmouth, Mike Phelan at Hull and Craig Shakespeare at Leicester)

Claudio Ranieri
(Garry Monk at Swansea, Jose Mourinho at Chelsea and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer at Manchester United)

Dean Smith
(Rafael Benitez at Everton, Claudio Ranieri at Watford and Sean Dyche at Burnley)

Arsene Wenger
(Ruud Gullit at Chelsea, Peter Reid at Sunderland and Ronald Koeman at Everton)

4 – Raphael Benitez
(Alain Perrin at Portsmouth, Tony Adams at Portsmouth, Nigel Adkins at Southampton and Mauricio Pellegrino at Southampton)

Antonio Conte
(Roberto Di Matteo at Chelsea, Alan Pardew at Crystal Palace, Tony Pulis at West Brom and Marcelo Bielsa at Leeds)

Sir Alex Ferguson
(Howard Wilkinson at Leeds, David Pleat at Sheffield Wednesday, Steve Wigley at Southampton and Martin O’Neill at Sunderland)

5 – Roberto Martinez
(Avram Grant at West Ham, Steve Bruce at Sunderland, Roberto Mancini at Manchester City, David Moyes at Manchester United and Brendan Rodgers at Liverpool)

6 – Jurgen Klopp
(Francesco Guidolin at Swansea, Slaven Bilic at West Ham, Slavisa Jokanovic at Fulham, Jose Mourinho at Manchester United, Marco Silva at Everton and Scott Parker at Bournemouth)

7 – Sam Allardyce
(Alan Pardew at West Ham, Martin Jol at Tottenham, Lawrie Sanchez at Fulham, Martin Jol at Fulham, Michael Laudrup at Swansea, Roberto Martinez at Everton and Paul Clement at Swansea)

Sam Allardyce laughs

Teams who induced sackings

1 – 20 different teams
In a number which includes MK Dons, Wycome and Udinese, 20 different clubs have inflicted results so damaging that a manager paid with their job soon after.

2 – Blackburn
(Peter Reid at Manchester City and Roy Hodgson at Liverpool)

Bolton
(Alan Pardew at West Ham and Sam Allardyce at Blackburn)

Charlton
(Chris Hutchings at Bradford and Peter Taylor at Leicester)

Crystal Palace
(Gary Megson at West Brom and Claude Puel at Leicester)

Fulham
(Howard Wilkinson at Sunderland and Steven Gerrard at Aston Villa)

Middlesbrough
(Walter Smith at Everton and Terry Venables at Leeds)

Portsmouth
(Dave Bassett at Nottingham Forest and Peter Reid at Leeds)

Stoke
(Paul Hart at Portsmouth and Alan Irvine at West Brom)

Tottenham
(Steve Bruce at Newcastle and Marcelo Bielsa at Leeds)

Watford
(Danny Wilson at Sheffield Wednesday and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer at Manchester United)

3 – Arsenal
(Ruud Gullit at Chelsea, Peter Reid at Sunderland and Ronald Koeman at Everton)

Hull
(Luiz Felipe Scolari at Chelsea, Gary Megson at Bolton and Paul Lambert at Aston Villa)

4-Everton
(David Moyes at Manchester United, Brendan Rodgers at Liverpool, Paul Clement at Swansea and Jose Mourinho at Tottenham)

Norwich
(Mike Walker at Everton, Rafael Benitez at Everton, Claudio Ranieri at Watford and Sean Dyche at Burnley)

5 – Aston Villa
(Ian Porterfield at Chelsea, Colin Todd at Derby, Sir Bobby Robson at Newcastle, Brian McDermott at Reading and Gus Poyet at Sunderland)

Chelsea
(Kenny Dalglish at Newcastle, Chris Hutchings at Wigan, Nigel Adkins at Southampton, Alan Pardew at Crystal Palace and Tony Pulis at West Brom)

Leicester
(George Graham at Arsenal, Garry Monk at Swansea, Jose Mourinho at Chelsea, Marco Silva at Watford, Manuel Pellegrini at West Ham)

Manchester City
(Graeme Souness at Newcastle, Mick McCarthy at Sunderland, Chris Coleman at Fulham, Roberto Di Matteo at West Brom and Slaven Bilic at West Brom)

Manchester United
(Howard Wilkinson at Leeds, David Pleat at Sheffield Wednesday, Steve Wigley at Southampton, Martin O’Neill at Sunderland and Mark Hughes at Southampton)

wigan
(Iain Dowie at Charlton, Paul Ince at Blackburn, Avram Grant at West Ham, Steve Bruce at Sunderland, Roberto Mancini at Manchester City)

6 – Newcastle
(Gianluca Vialli at Chelsea, Martin Jol at Tottenham, Lawrie Sanchez at Fulham, Mauricio Pellegrino at Southampton, Javi Gracia at Watford and Ralph Hasenhuttl at Southampton)

West Ham
(Stuart Gray at Southampton, Martin Jol at Fulham, Michael Laudrup at Swansea, Bob Bradley at Swansea, Nigel Pearson at Watford and Bruno Lage at Wolves)

7 – West Brom
(Chris Hughton at Newcastle, Mick McCarthy at Wolves, Andre Villas-Boas at Chelsea, Paolo Di Canio at Sunderland, Chris Hughton at Norwich, Mike Phelan at Hull and Craig Shakespeare at Leicester)

8 – Southampton
(Roy Hodgson at Blackburn, Glenn Hoddle at Tottenham, Mark Hughes at QPR, Malky Mackay at Cardiff, Neil Warnock at Crystal Palace, Claudio Ranieri at Fulham, Quique Sanchez Flores at Watford and Dean Smith at Aston Villa)

10 – Liverpool
(Jean Tigana at Fulham, Alain Perrin at Portsmouth, Tony Adams at Portsmouth, Rene Meulensteen at Fulham, Francesco Guidolin at Swansea, Slaven Bilic at West Ham, Slavisa Jokanovic at Fulham, Jose Mourinho at Manchester United, Marco Silva at Everton and Scott Parker at Bournemouth)

Managers who induced consecutive sackings
Sir Alex Ferguson – Howard Wilkinson at Leeds and David Pleat at Sheffield Wednesday

Roy Hodgson – Mick McCarthy at Wolves and Andre Villas-Boas at Chelsea

Roberto Martinez – Avram Grant at West Ham and Steve Bruce at Sunderland

Stuart Pearce – Graeme Souness at Newcastle and Mick McCarthy at Sunderland

Claudio Ranieri – Garry Monk at Swansea and Jose Mourinho at Chelsea

Dean Smith – Rafael Benitez at Everton and Claudio Ranieri at Watford

Managers who induced multiple sackings in same season
Stuart Pearce – Graeme Souness at Newcastle and Mick McCarthy at Sunderland in 2005/06

Sam Allardyce – Martin Jol at Tottenham and Lawrie Sanchez at Fulham in 2007/08

Roy Hodgson – Mick McCarthy at Wolves and Andre Villas-Boas at Chelsea in 2011/12

Sam Allardyce – Martin Jol at Fulham and Michael Laudrup at Swansea in 2013/14

Claudio Ranieri – Garry Monk at Swansea and Jose Mourinho at Chelsea in 2015/16

Jurgen Klopp – Slavisa Jokanovic at Fulham and Jose Mourinho at Manchester United in 2018/19

Dean Smith – Rafael Benitez at Everton, Claudio Ranieri at Watford and Sean Dyche at Burnley in 2021/22

Managers who induced and then suffered sackings in same season
Jean Tigana (Fulham, 2002/03) – beat Howard Wilkinson’s Sunderland 1-0; sacked after 2-0 defeat to Gerard Houllier’s Liverpool

Nigel Adkins (Southampton, 2012/13) – beat Mark Hughes’ QPR 3-1; sacked after drawing 2-2 with Rafael Benitez’s Chelsea

Steve Clarke (West Brom, 2013/14) – beat Paolo Di Canio’s Sunderland 3-0; sacked after 1-0 defeat to Malky Mackay’s Cardiff

Malky Mackay (Cardiff, 2013/14) – beat Steve Clarke’s West Brom 1-0; sacked after 3-0 defeat to Mauricio Pochettino’s Southampton

Garry Monk (Cardiff, 2015/16) – beat Tim Sherwood’s Aston Villa 2-1; sacked after 3-0 defeat to Claudio Ranieri’s Leicester

Roberto Martinez (Everton, 2015/16) – drew 1-1 with Brendan Rodgers’ Liverpool; sacked after 3-0 defeat to Sam Allardyce’s Sunderland

Tony Pulis (West Brom, 2016/17) – drew 1-1 with Craig Shakespeare’s Leicester; sacked after 4-0 defeat to Antonio Conte’s Chelsea

Jose Mourinho (Manchester United, 2018/19) – drew 1-1 with Mark Hughes’ Southampton; sacked after 3-1 defeat to Jurgen Klopp’s Liverpool

Marcelo Bielsa (Leeds, 2021/22) – beat Xisco Munoz’s Watford 1-0; sacked after 4-0 defeat to Antonio Conte’s Tottenham

Claudio Ranieri (Watford, 2021/22) – beat Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s Manchester United 4-1; sacked after 3-0 defeat to Dean Smith’s Norwich

Dean Smith (2021/22) – sacked after 1-0 defeat to Ralph Hasenhuttl’s Southampton; beat Rafael Benitez’s Everton 2-1, Claudio Ranieri’s Watford 3-0 and Sean Dyche’s Burnley 2-0

Managers to get same manager sacked more than once
Sam Allardyce – beat Martin Jol’s Tottenham 3-1 with Newcastle and Martin Jol’s Fulham 3-0 with West Ham.

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