I compared my Aldi shop from last year with prices today – here’s what I found

The cost of living is impacting households across the country from increases in energy bills or rising petrol prices at the pumps.

However, the gradual increase in the price of essentials and life’s little luxuries is harder to spot. And when it comes to food shopping, those extra pennies we are spending can soon add up almost without us noticing.

Hull Live has taken a look at an Aldi price comparison after finding an Aldi receipt from a weekly family shop last June. It was hard to tell at first what had gone up in the past 11 months.

Read more: Shoppers praise £ 65 Currys ‘kettle replacement’ that takes 30 seconds to boil

Here’s what they found. It was only after going online and comparing prices now with the prices in store last year, that the increases started to mount up. A few items were actually cheaper, but the vast majority had gone up.

And with inflation set to hit 10 per cent this year, not to mention that national insurance tax rise and the huge increase in gas and electricity bills, the nation’s finances are under enormous strain.

The table below shows the items bought at Aldi on June 6, 2021 at the branch in Tewkesbury Road, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, compared with the website price listed at Aldi.co.uk on May 5, 2022. The order, including duplicates, is based on the original receipt from last year.

Last year there were some items bought that could not be compared like-for-like, including items listed as French cheese, white potatoes because of different weights, part-baked rolls and vanilla Oreos.

The overall difference in price between June 2021 and May 2022 is £ 7.54, or more than 11 per cent. Of course, the overall amount we spend in a week can vary – are we stocking up on alcohol, meat, catering for visitors?

So while £ 7.54 may not seem like a lot in the grand scheme of things, add that extra up over a month, a year, and it soon becomes a more substantial sum.

Item June 2021 May 2022

Four Seasons Hash Browns

69p

85p

Omega Fish Fingers

£ 1.39

£ 1.49

Frozen Broccoli / Green Bean

59p

59p

Vegetable medley

79p

95p

Fish burger

£ 1.49

£ 1.65

Fish burger

£ 1.49

£ 1.65

Butter unsalted

£ 1.48

£ 1.75

Butter unsalted

£ 1.48

£ 1.75

Clotted cream

£ 1.39

£ 1.49

Cod / haddock / smoked haddock

£ 2.89

£ 2.89

Edam / Gouda cheese

£ 1.89

£ 2.39

Deli filler

£ 1.15

£ 1.35

Parmesan bag

£ 1.19

£ 1.29

Orange Juice

£ 1.55

£ 1.69

Mini roule cheese

89p

£ 1.05

Olives

£ 1.59

£ 1.79

Cheese selection

£ 2.29

£ 2.49

Parma Ham

£ 1.99

£ 1.99

Ripe cheddar cheese

£ 1.79

£ 1.89

Smoked salmon slice

£ 2.99

£ 3.99

Smoked salmon slice

£ 2.99

£ 3.99

Whole Milk 4pt

£ 1.09

£ 1.25

Bagels plain

69p

79p

Carrots 1kg

40p

40p

Red grapes

£ 1.39

£ 1.49

Red grapes

£ 1.39

£ 1.49

Pains au chocolate

95p

95p

Baguettes white

42p

49p

Brioche buns

89p

89p

Brioche buns

89p

89p

Strawberries

£ 1.75

£ 1.53

Strawberries

£ 1.75

£ 1.53

Handwash anti-bacterial

69p

65p

Handwash anti-bacterial

69p

65p

Croissants

95p

99p

Pineapple

75p

79p

Courgettes

£ 1.15

£ 1.15

Tomato mixed

£ 1.39

£ 1.65

Chopped iceberg let

47p

57p

Pork fillet

£ 3.26

£ 3.26

Cucumber

43p

45p

Avocado

59p

89p

Avocado

59p

89p

Loose red pepper

42p

43p

Salad tomatoes

68p

69p

Peaches

95p

£ 1.79

Brown onions

55p

75p

Tunnocks teacakes

95p

99p

Coca-Cola 10 pack

£ 3.99

b

TOTAL

£ 63.91

£ 71.45

The increases at the till are, of course, affecting all supermarkets and other retailers. Data released last month showed that the price of groceries is increasing at its fastest rate in 11 years, adding an extra £ 271 to the amount average households will pay at the till this year.

Data from Kantar showed that grocery price inflation hit 5.9% in April, as the number of items on promotion decreased. It is the fastest rise since December 2011.

“The average household will now be exposed to a potential price increase of £ 271 per year,” said Fraser McKevitt, head of retail and consumer insight at Kantar. “A lot of this is going on non-discretionary, everyday essentials, which will prove difficult to cut back on as budgets are squeezed.

“We’re seeing a clear flight to value as shoppers watch their pennies. The level of products bought on promotion, currently at 27.3%, has decreased 2.7 percentage points as everyday low price strategies come to the fore. “

Campaigner Jack Monroe recently criticized supermarkets for taking their cheapest everyday items off shelves.

She argued that inflation – which tracks the cost of the same items over time – is an imperfect way of measuring how much prices are increasing because the cheapest products are no longer available.

Mr McKevitt said supermarkets have been listening, with Asda, Morrisons and Tesco all taking steps to offer cheaper food to customers. Kantar found that supermarket sales dropped 5.9% over the 12 weeks to April 17.

Sales are also, for the first time since the pandemic started, 0.6% below where they were two years ago. This period now takes into account the early days of the first lockdown.

Aldi is the fastest growing retailer, with its sales increasing 4.2%, while Lidl saw a 4% rise. Mr McKevitt said: “Over one million extra shoppers visited Aldi and Lidl respectively over the past 12 weeks compared with this time last year.

“Both retailers achieved record-breaking market shares, with Aldi now holding 8.8% while Lidl stands at 6.6%. Collectively, the two discounters account for 15.4% of the market – up from just 5.5% a decade ago. “

Tesco was the only other retailer whose market share grew over the period – by 0.3 percentage points to 27.3%. Mr McKevitt said some customers are stocking up on goods that might become scarce because of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. “The combination of rising prices and increased demand saw the cooking oil market grow by 17% over April. Sunflower oil, Britain’s most popular choice for frying, and vegetable oil grew even faster – up by 27% and 40% respectively. “

And last week, Conservatives were branded “out of touch” after a Cabinet minister suggested consumers should swap to value brands as the cost-of-living crisis continues to bite. Environment Secretary George Eustice has been rounded on by political rivals and social commentators after saying that shoppers could “contain and manage their household budget” by changing the brands they buy in supermarkets and elsewhere.

READ NEXT:

.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.